Twitter LinkedIn Share this page Facebook RSS

Blogs

Employment & Labor Law BlogLegal updates, news, and commentary from the attorneys of Baker Sterchi Cowden & Rice LLC

Chiefs Rally (in the courtroom)

March 11, 2013 | David Eisenberg

In the wake of the Chiefs’ recent courtroom setback in which their arbitration agreement with employees was held unenforceable (see post  Kansas City Chiefs Start the Season 0-2), the Chiefs recently went to trial in an age discrimination case filed by a 61-year old maintenance manager with 12 years of service. The employee claimed he was fired because of his age; the Chiefs asserted he was fired for insubordination and poor performance.  Plaintiff sought $400,000 in compensatory damages, plus punitive damages.   The Chiefs made a $75,000 offer of judgment before trial.  The jury returned a defense verdict.

Cox v. The Kansas City Chiefs Football Club, Inc., case no. 1116CV14143 (Jackson Co. Circuit Court)


Related Services: Employment & Labor
Attorneys: David Eisenberg

Subscribe
About Employment & Labor Law Blog

The BSCR Employment & Labor Law Blog examines topics and developments of interest to employers, Human Resources professionals, and others with an interest in recent legal developments concerning the workplace. This blog will focus on Missouri and Kansas law, and on major developments under federal law, and at the EEOC and NLRB.  Learn more about the editor, David M. Eisenberg, and our Employment & Labor  practice.

DISCLAIMER

The Employment & Labor Law Blog is made available by Baker Sterchi Cowden & Rice LLC for educational purposes only as well as to give you general information and a general understanding of the law, not to provide specific legal advice. Your use of this blog site alone creates no attorney client relationship between you and the firm.

CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION

Do not include confidential information in comments or other feedback or messages related to the Employment & Labor Law Blog, as these are neither confidential nor secure methods of communicating with attorneys. The Employment & Labor Law Blog should not be used as a substitute for competent legal advice from a licensed professional attorney in your state.